Whatever You Call A Soft Drink, It’s Bad For Your Teeth

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The soft drink has many names in the United States. On the East and West coasts, they call it soda. In the Midwest, many people refer to it as pop. And in the South, it’s often called Coke (even if it’s Pepsi). But no matter what you call a soft drink’s sugary concoction, it’s a recipe for disaster for your oral health.

Why? Because a soft drink is full of acids and sugar byproducts that are acidic. The combination softens your tooth enamel, which is the first step on the road to a cavity. While sugar-free soft drinks are slightly less impactful on your oral health, they are still acidic and can negatively affect your teeth.

Soft drink consumption in the United States has been declining for many years, but Americans still consume an average of 400 12-ounce servings per person per year. That’s 3,200 teaspoons of sugar ingested annually! Long-term consumption of soft drinks over many years increases the odds that you’ll suffer tooth decay problems at some point.

That consumption of all that sugar and the acid in soft drinks is especially damaging to the oral health of children and teenagers, whose teeth are still in the formative stages.

So what should you do to reduce the impact on your oral health and protect your children’s developing teeth? Here are some ideas to implement in your household:

Try different drinks: Skip the soft drinks and fill your fridge with beverages low in sugar and acid. These include water, milk and pure fruit juice. Unsugared ice tea is another good option to avoid sugar.

Rinse, rinse, rinse: Be sure to reach for a glass of water if you do consume a soft drink. It’s a great way to flush all the sugar and acids deposited in your mouth by the soft drink you just drank.

Grab the fluoride: Fluoride strengthens the enamel on your teeth and lowers the risk of cavities. So be sure to brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and for an extra dose of fluoride, rinse with a mouthwash that contains fluoride.

Get professional help: Be sure to visit your dentist twice a year for a dental hygiene visit to get all the gunk off your teeth that built up over the last six months. You can also request a fluoride treatment during your visit.

While soft drinks are tough on your teeth, you can reduce their impact on your oral health by following our four tips.

SOURCE: Colgate

 

Top 10 Facts About Your Teeth That Will Surprise You

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We often don’t think about our teeth unless they are bugging us, but they are incredibly important to our overall health and wellbeing. After all, they help us eat, chew, talk and smile. And they are an incredibly complex and often misunderstood part of our anatomy. Here’s 10 interesting facts about your teeth that you might not know:

  1. At First Glance

The first feature people notice about another person is their smile, according to a survey done by the American Academy of Periodontology. And good teeth are kind of important to a good smile.

  1. In the Womb

Although a child’s teeth don’t start to appear until the child is six to 12 month’s old, they actually begin forming before they are born. Baby teeth, also called milk teeth, begin forming when the child is in the womb.

  1. 40 Sets of Teeth?

While humans only have two sets of teeth (32 teeth total), other species vary widely in the number of sets of teeth. Sharks top the list with around 40 sets of teeth!

  1. That’s A Lot of Toothpaste!

US consumers buy more than 14 million gallons of toothpaste annually. The typical person spends 38 days of their lifetime using that toothpaste to brush their teeth!

  1. Name All Four Types of Teeth

There are four different types of teeth used by humans to cut, tear and grind their food. They are incisors, canines, premolars, and molars.

  1. The Power of Saliva

Your saliva is critical to your oral health because it protects your teeth from bacteria in your mouth (and bacteria are the first ingredient in the formation of a cavity) and helps you digest your food. The typical person produces 25,000 quarts of saliva in their lifetime.

  1. Undercover

More than one-third of the length of your tooth is hidden out of sight underneath your gums. The part that is hidden is the root.

  1. Now That’s A Valuable Tooth

Sir Isaac Newton holds the record for the most valuable tooth. It sold for $3,633 in 1812, which today would be worth $35,700. Why would someone want to buy his tooth? To set in a ring!

  1. Inflation From the Tooth Fairy

In 1950, the Tooth Fairy left on average 25 cents. That went up to $1.00 in 1988, and now the rate is up to almost $2.00!

  1. No Self Repair

The bones and tissue in your body can repair themselves – but your teeth can’t. That’s why fillings and other dental work are necessary to protect your teeth from further damage once you have an oral health problem.

Is Xerostomia Making Your Life Uncomfortable?

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Does your mouth feel constantly dry? If it does, then you may have xerostomia – also known as dry mouth.

What is dry mouth? Simply, a lack of saliva. You need saliva to keep your mouth moist, to cleanse it, and to digest food. In addition, your saliva controls bacteria and fungi which prevents infections in your mouth. If you suffer from dry mouth, you are at a higher risk of gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay, and mouth infections, such as thrush. Dry mouth can also make it hard to wear dentures.

Dry Mouth Causes

Medications. One of the leading causes of dry mouth are certain types of prescription and nonprescription drugs. Among the main culprits are drugs used to treat pain, depression, allergies, anxiety, obesity, colds, epilepsy, acne, diarrhea, hypertension, nausea, asthma, urinary incontinence, psychotic disorders and Parkinson's disease. Muscle relaxants and sedatives can also produce dry mouth.

The side effects of certain diseases and infections. Dry mouth can be a side effect of certain medical conditions, including HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, mumps, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, Parkinson's disease, hypertension, stroke, anemia and diabetes.

The side effects of some medical treatments. If the salivary glands are damaged, it can reduce the amount of saliva that you produce. Cancer treatments that involve radiation to the neck and head or chemotherapy can cut down on the amount of saliva produced.

Nerve damage. An injury or surgery in the head or neck can create nerve damage that causes dry mouth.

Dehydration. If you become dehydrated because of excessive sweating, fever, vomiting, blood loss, diarrhea and burns, these can lead to dry mouth.

Removal of the salivary glands through surgery.

Your lifestyle. If you smoke or chew tobacco, the amount of saliva you produce can be affected and this can aggravate dry mouth. If you regularly breath with your mouth open you may also experience dry mouth.

Dry Mouth Symptoms

  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • Frequent thirst
  • A burning or tingling sensation in the mouth and especially on the tongue
  • Bad breath
  • A dry, red, raw tongue
  • Sores in the mouth; sores or split skin at the corners of the mouth; cracked lips
  • Hoarseness, dry nasal passages, sore throat
  • Problems speaking or trouble tasting, chewing, and swallowing

Dry Mouth Treatment

If you are taking a medication that may be causing your dry mouth, talk to your dentist about the problem. He may suggest that you talk to your medical doctor about adjusting the dosage you take or switching to a different drug that doesn't cause dry mouth.

Another option is to use an oral rinse such as Biotene to restore the moisture in your mouth. You might also consider Salagen, which is a medication that increases saliva production.

Additional steps you can try that can help improve saliva production include:

  • Try sucking on sugar-free candy or chew sugar-free gum.
  • Drink lots of water to help keep your mouth moist.
  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste, use a fluoride rinse, and visit your dentist regularly.
  • Breathe through your nose, not your mouth, as much as possible.
  • Use a room vaporizer to add moisture to the bedroom air.
  • Use an over-the-counter artificial saliva substitute.

SOURCE: WebMD

When You Brush Your Teeth, Do Your Gums Bleed?

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If your gums bleed regularly when you brush your teeth, you may be suffering from the early stages of periodontal disease. The earliest stages of this disease of the gums causes inflammation of your gum tissue, followed by bleeding from your gums when you brush. If you don’t take care of periodontal disease, it can progress to causing significant damage to the soft tissues and bones in your mouth, and can lead to loss of teeth.

Periodontal disease usually begins because of inadequate brushing and flossing. Both help remove bacteria from your mouth, and bacteria leads to plaque, which begins the steps that lead to periodontal disease. Some people are more prone to gum problems because of diabetes, certain medications, hormonal changes for women, other illnesses, and susceptibility because of genetics. But for the majority of the population who don’t have those issues, there is a direct link between inadequate oral health care and periodontal disease.

The initial physical sign of periodontal disease is inflammation of the gums, which is called gingivitis. Your gums will look red and swollen and when you brush, your gums may bleed easily. At this stage, you won’t be dealing with bone or tissue loss.

However, the next stage of periodontal disease is much more impactful on your oral health. If your gingivitis is not taken care of, the inflammation in your gums will move into the area around your teeth. Your gum tissue will begin to move away from your teeth and form pockets of infection. At this point, your bones, gums and tissue that support your teeth can be destroyed if left untreated.

So now that you know what happens if periodontal disease takes up residence in your mouth, what can you do to prevent this nasty oral health disease? Follow these four simple tips:

  • Be sure to brush your teeth twice daily and always use a toothpaste with fluoride
  • Make a habit of flossing daily to get rid of plaque from between the teeth
  • See your dental hygienist every six months for your routine cleaning and a check-up by your dentist
  • Avoid smoking

Follow this basic plan, and you are sure to keep your gums healthy, your teeth happy, and continue to have a winning smile.

Source: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

 

Avoid Stained Teeth with These Three Simple Tips

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If you want to keep your teeth bright and white, but don’t want to cut out the foods and beverages that are most likely to stain your teeth, we have three simple tips you can follow.                                                                              

So what foods and beverages are most likely to stain your teeth? The ones that are most intensely colored are the top culprits. The color comes from intensely pigmented molecules called chromogens, which have the unfortunate habit of sticking to the enamel on your teeth.

Chromogens combine with the acid in certain foods and beverages to deliver a double dose of trouble to your tooth enamel. The acid softens your tooth’s enamel, making it easier for the chromogens to stain your teeth. The chromogens also can get a boost to their staining power from a food compound called tannin.

Foods and beverages that are the biggest teeth-staining culprits are wine (red and white), black tea, colas, sports drinks, deeply colored sauces (tomato sauce, curry sauce, soy sauce), berries and hard candy. 

To minimize the impact of these foods and beverages on your teeth then follow these three simple steps:

Consider using a straw. By sipping your beverage through a straw you will help keep teeth-staining beverages away from your teeth — especially your front teeth. You probably won’t want to use a straw for coffee or wine, but you should definitely consider using a straw for juices, cola, and iced tea.

Be sure to swallow promptly. Protect your teeth from stains by promptly swallowing stain-causing foods and beverages (especially beverages). Of course you want to thoroughly chew your food and savor the flavors, but be mindful of the teeth-staining power of what you have in your mouth.

Be a water swisher. It’s may not always convenient for you to brush your teeth after eating or drinking. Even when it is, it might be better not to: dental enamel is highly vulnerable to abrasion from tooth brushing for up to 30 minutes after the consumption of an acidic food or beverage. So it’s safer simply to swish with water — and brush later, once the enamel has had a chance to re-harden. Another way to remove stain-causing substances without brushing is to chew sugarless gum after eating or drinking.

And don’t forget the importance of brushing and flossing daily and be sure to see a dentist periodically — and to avoid smoking or chewing tobacco. These long-term strategies, combined with the simple tips we’ve mentioned, should keep you smiling for years to come.

Sources: WebMD and Personal Care Dentistry

 

How Clean Is Your Toothbrush?

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When you brush you teeth in the morning, you’re probably not aware of what may be lurking on the bristles of your toothbrush.

It may be contaminated with bacteria or viruses if you’ve been sick. Even if you haven’t been sick, normal healthy microorganisms can cause infections in your mouth if there is an injury or break in your gum tissues. In addition, a brand new toothbrush still in its packaging might already have bacteria on it since the packaging doesn’t have to be “sterile” to be sold.

So what can you do to keep from getting sick from your toothbrush?

 

 Clean It!

Cleaning your toothbrush might not be at the top of your “to do” list since you rinse it off every day after you brush. But it’s actually an important item to add to your daily list. Here’s three “must dos” for your toothbrush to keep it clean:

Wash it. Thoroughly rinse your toothbrush with hot tap water after you brush to remove debris and wash away bacteria. If you’re suffering from a systemic illness or immune system disorder, you should consider regularly soaking your toothbrush in a glass of antibacterial mouthwash or run it through a cycle in your dishwasher.

Deep clean it. Consider purchasing a toothbrush sanitizer – there are a range of them available. They often use ultraviolet light to kill microorganism in as little as three minutes.

Keep it properly stored. Always store your toothbrush upright – in a cup or rack – so that it can properly dry out. If you want to put a cover on it, be sure to use one that allows air to circulate to prevent mold and bacteria growth.

 

Toss It!

How often should you toss your toothbrush to prevent bacteria from building up on it? Here are a couple of useful tips:

When to let it go. It’s recommended that you replace your toothbrush every 3 to 4 months, or sooner if the bristles show excessive signs of wear. Bristles that are frayed will not effectively clean your teeth.

If you’re ill, get rid of it. Toss your toothbrush if it was used while you were sick. If you share a toothbrush holder with other family members, and one of them is sick, be sure to throw away all of the toothbrushes in the holder. Also, be sure to treat electric or power models the same way you handle an old-fashioned one. Get rid of the brush attachment after an illness or when the bristles begin to show signs of wear.

 

Don’t Share It!

If you’re tempted to lend your toothbrush to a family member or friend, just say “no”. The same advice is applicable if you’re thinking of borrowing a used toothbrush. By sharing, you’re transferring saliva and bacteria to the other person. Remember, bacteria is the first stage of the process that leads to cavities. Plus tooth decay is considered an infectious disease – one more reason not to share or borrow a toothbrush.

 

SOURCE: WebMD

 

Sugar Isn’t the Only Culprit When It Comes to Causing Cavities

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